Superintendent Taymore Presents Progress Report on 100-Day Plan

Superintendent of Schools Cyndy Taymore presented a progress report on her 100-day plan for the Melrose schools at the School Committee last night. She has made great headway, and I continue to be impressed with her hard work and dedication to our district.

100 Day Plan Progress Report

She also presented the organizational chart for school administration. These are the people who work for you:

District Organizational Chart

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Sitting Down with Melrose’s Aldermen: A Conversation with Ward 6 Alderman Peter Mortimer

Mayor’s Office interns become better acquainted with their elected officials.

Ward 6 Alderman: Peter D. Mortimer

Interview Conducted by Brian P. Senier

Where did you grow up? If Melrose, what elementary school did you go to?

I grew up in Melrose since seventh grade, since I was twelve. I went to the Coolidge Junior High School, which is what we called middle school back then. It is now apartments on Main Street across from Memorial Hall.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study there and how did this prepare you for your role in city government?

I went to Boston College. My major was psychology, which made me understand a little deeper what people want and how to get things done. I also have a good grounding in municipal law and environmental law. There are a lot of wet areas in Melrose, and it helps if you understand environmental law.

Continue reading “Sitting Down with Melrose’s Aldermen: A Conversation with Ward 6 Alderman Peter Mortimer”

Sitting Down with Melrose’s Aldermen: Alderman at Large Donald L. Conn, Jr.

Mayor’s Office interns become better acquainted with their elected officials.

Alderman-at-Large: Donald L. Conn Jr.

Interview Conducted by Brian P. Senier

Where did you grow up? If Melrose, what elementary school did you go to?

Yes, and I went to the Winthrop School.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study there and how did this prepare you for your role in city government?

I went to Tufts University and Boston College Law School. I was a double major in history and political science. Many of the courses I took focused on government.

How long have you been a member of the Board of the Aldermen?

I have been an Alderman for 13 years: 1990-1993 and 2004 to the present.

Why did you decide to become an Alderman?

I wanted to be involved and I wanted to help the community.

Continue reading “Sitting Down with Melrose’s Aldermen: Alderman at Large Donald L. Conn, Jr.”

Welcome Class of 2025!

MHS athletes played soccer with the incoming students, and they also brought T-shirts for the newcomers.

School starts next week, and last night we welcomed the incoming kindergarten students to the Melrose Public Schools with an evening of slush, games, and fun. Melrose High School athletes came out to play volleyball, soccer, and other games with the incoming students, and everyone gathered for a big group picture. Each incoming student received a Class of 2025 button that will allow the child and a parent to attend Melrose High School football games for free. Here are a few highlights of the evening; the group photo will be available from our office next week.

Continue reading “Welcome Class of 2025!”

Sitting Down with Melrose’s Aldermen: Alderman at Large Jaclyn Bird

Mayor’s Office interns become better acquainted with their elected officials.

Alderman-at-Large: Jaclyn L. Bird

Interview Conducted by Brian P. Senier

Where did you grow up? If Melrose, what elementary school did you go to?

I grew up in Melrose and attended both the Beebe and Roosevelt Schools.  I have great memories of those years and was lucky to be surrounded by wonderful teachers and families at both schools.

Where did you go to college?  What did you study there and how did this prepare you for your role in city government?

I graduated from Washington College, a small liberal-arts school on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.  I majored in American Studies, with minors in Political Science and History.  I think having a well-rounded education, with a concentration in government, has been very helpful with my role on the Board.

Washington College, though it is a small school, has an incredibly diverse student body.  I know that being in classes with students from all over the country and around the world gave me a better understanding of how our life experiences shape our views and why we sometimes view issues with such different perspectives.  This made me a better listener and I think that is a tremendously helpful skill to have in any job.

How long have you been a member of the Board of the Aldermen?

I was appointed to the Board of Aldermen in March 2011 to fill a vacancy on the board.  In November 2011, I was elected to a two-year term.

Why did you decide to become an Alderman?

I have always been active in the city, whether through my past professional work with the Melrose Alliance Against Violence (MAAV) or through volunteering to lead the Franklin Early Childhood Center (ECC) P.T.O.   When I found out that the Board was looking for applicants to fill a vacant seat, I saw this opportunity as an extension of my community involvement.

What is your favorite aspect of being an Alderman?

Do I have to pick just one?!  There are many—I find it fascinating…what it takes to keep a great city running smoothly; trying to figure out how to create a balance of providing excellent city services while keeping costs down for residents; meeting new people in the community; and hearing from the city employees about their individual departments.  I learn so much from listening to everyone around me, including my colleagues on the Board who have been great mentors for me.

Do you have any other interests? If so, what are they?

No other interests at all…strictly municipal budgets.  Just kidding!  Yes, I do have other interests. I enjoy spending time with my family, reading, and going to the beach.

What is one interesting thing about the ward in which you live?

I am an Alderman-at-Large, so I represent the whole city, but I am a resident of Ward 4.  My family moved to Porter Street last year and my children are now the 5th generation of my family to live on Porter Street. Though, now I am realizing that this is probably only interesting to me!

What do you like most about Melrose?

Melrose has so much to offer, with such an easy commute to Boston, but with the benefits of a quiet, residential setting. We have a vibrant small business community, both downtown and in the other business districts in the city.  I love the programs that Melrose offers for young families: organized and drop-in activities through the Recreation Department, the Winter Festival at Mount Hood, Community Nights Out in the summer, movies at Memorial Hall, the Lloyd pool on Tremont Street, the Melrose Kids Club, etc.  I think the people, though, are what make our community so unique.  We have volunteers on Little League and soccer fields, robotics teams, the Milano Senior Center, Veterans’ organizations, energy conservation groups, PTOs, and more.  These volunteers are all personally invested in seeing Melrose thrive and I think that enthusiasm and dedication really sets us apart.

If you could change one thing about Melrose, what would it be and why?

I don’t think there is one thing specifically that I would like to see changed, but rather certain areas where we could expand and improve.  These would include an aggressive water conservation plan, improvements to Melrose High School, which are ongoing, and regionalization of services where appropriate.  Melrose is in a great place right now and I am happy to support programs that keep us moving in the right direction.

Melrose IT director picks up national award

Our Information Technology director, Jorge Pazos, is in California as I write this, attending the CIO 100 Symposium, and last night he accepted the CIO 100 Award on behalf of the City of Melrose. The award recognizes our IT department’s innovative approach, which has allowed them not only to manage the City’s computer resources with great efficiency but also to provide support services to the Town of Essex in an unprecedented regionalization agreement. I am proud of our department, and I expect great things from them in the future. But for now: Congratulations, Jorge!

Guest Post: Famous Melrosians

By Abraham Zimmerman

You have, most likely, seen their faces before, but did you know that these individuals are from Melrose?

Have you ever tuned in to watch the Red Sox on New England Sports Network (NESN)? If so, then you are sure to have heard the voice of Melrose native Don Orsillo.  Orsillo has been the play-by-play commentator for the Red Sox since 2001. He was born in Melrose on December 16, 1968.  He went to Northeastern and received a degree in communications before starting his work as a broadcaster.

Most people know of Associate Justice David Souter, but few know that he was born in Melrose on September 17, 1939.  Souter was nominated for the Supreme Court by President George H. W. Bush in 1990, and he retired after the spring session of 2009.  Souter was replaced by Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Melrose is just full of sports broadcasters.  Andy Brickley, born in Melrose on August 9, 1961, is the color commentator for NESN hockey.  Brickley became a commentator in 2000 after playing professional hockey for 13 years. Those 13 years even included a stint with the Boston Bruins.

 

Perhaps the youngest famous Melrosian is Olympian Steve Langton.  Langton is a push and brake man for the U.S. National Bobsled team.  He competed in the 2010 Olympics, where his four man bobsled team placed 10th.  He has had more luck in competition recently, placing second in the two man bobsled competition at the 2011 World Cup.  Langton was born in Melrose on April 15, 1983.